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I started my career by analyzing the processes of decentralization of collective agreements and the decrease in unionization in Israel, demonstrating that these factors explain a significant part of the sharp rise in wage inequality (IR 2007). To provide a comprehensive account of the development of Israel’s political economy and its stratification system, in my PhD dissertation I focused on the rise and fall of Israel’s national income distribution between workers’ compensation and capitalists’ profits (typically called "labor’s share of national income"). By studying the zero-sum distribution of national income, my work opened a new research front and has filled a lacuna in inequality research, which has largely overlooked this important issue in Israel and elsewhere. Theoretically, I developed a new political economy approach that stresses the importance of class organization and state policy in determining how national income is distributed (SP 2013).

In my research I work on various dimensions of economic inequality. I explain and demonstrate why and how economic inequality in Israel, the U.S. and other developed societies is related to institutional (e.g., labor unions) and structural (i.e., the linkages among jobs, firms, industries, and occupations) features of labor markets, which create differences in the ways incomes are allocated to individuals. Most of my research is based on quantitative methods and covers relatively long periods, for I am most interested in detecting and explaining social and economic changes.

My Take On

Inequality

Current Research

About Me

In my research I work on various dimensions of economic inequality. I explain and demonstrate why and how economic inequality in Israel, the U.S. and other developed societies is related to institutional (e.g., labor unions) and structural (i.e., the linkages among jobs, firms, industries, and occupations) features of labor markets, which create differences in the ways incomes are allocated to individuals. Most of my research is based on quantitative methods and covers relatively long periods, for I am most interested in detecting and explaining social and economic changes.

My Take On Inequality

About Me